Be an explorer of the world instead of a tourist stuck in hotel rooms — travel to remote places around the world and explore these lost cities and distant islands. Here are 7 of the most remote places in the world that you might want to tread:

NUVANUT, CANADA

baffin-bay-ice-berg-canadaIn the far northern reaches of Canada, you can walk on water. There’s a frozen territory in Nunavut, a mile out to sea on Canada’s Baffin Bay. There, you risk some slippery footing, but you can clamber up a half-pipe inside this massive berg.

 

RIFUGIO TORRE DI PISA, DOLOMITES, ITALYrifugio-torre-di-pisa-hotel-italy

In the Italian Dolomites, you’ll see hostel called Rifugio Torre di Pisa. But before you get there and see the world from above, you’ll have to plan the two-to-three-hour hike accordingly as it oly open from June to October.

 

CASA ANDINA, LAKE TITICACA, PERU

remote-hotels-casa-andina-isla-suasi-lake-titicaca-peruA four-hour speedboat ride across Lake Titicaca whisks guests to Casa Andina’s secluded location on Isla Suasi, where there’s no electricity, television, inhabitants, or buildings.

 

KOKOPELLI’S CAVE BED & BREAKFAST, FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO

remote-hotels-kokopellis-cave-new-mexicoYou’ll climb over fences, turn down dirt paths, and ultimately go down a sandstone trail 70 feet below ground level to reach Kokopelli’s, a 1,650-square-foot bed and breakfast built inside a 65-million-year-old rock formation.

 

THE MINORITY VILLAGES OF GUIZHOU, CHINA

dali-guizhou-chinaDrive three hours from Guiyang City until you reach Dali, a charming village. As you pass through rolling mountains, stop along the way and buy crafts (such as hand-made paper) made by the Dong, Buyi, and Miao people. The Indigo Lodge in nearby Zhaoxing, a beautiful Dong village, offers simple accommodations in a traditional setting.

 

“THE DOOR TO HELL,” DERWEZE, AHAL PROVINCE, TURKMENISTAN

darvaza-doorway-to-hell-turkmenistan-3-alamyLocated in the middle of the Karakum Desert in Turkmenistan is the “Door to Hell,” a name locals gave to a 230-foot-wide crater that simply won’t stop burning. The scientists decided to light the crater on fire to burn off the methane, creating a Dante-esque anomaly that has remained lit for the past 40-plus years. Recently, the crater has become more of a tourist attraction, but it’s still primarily a destination for adventurers.

 

THE PRINCIPALITY OF SEALAND

sealand-micronation-sign-mapheadIt might not look like much, but that lone structure 7 miles off the coast of Suffolk is the Principality of Sealand, the brainchild of an eccentric pirate radio broadcaster. The isolated nation in the North Sea boasts a flag, anthem, and even a soccer team. Sealand currently has a population of one: a caretaker who lives on the platform.

Source: Condé Nast Traveler